Epic Neighborhood Reporter, Activist Kills Self, Leaves First Draft of History Behind

This photo was found at Lee Perlman's home after his death. It shows Perlman (at right) during the 1970s, when he was active in the group Portland Tenants Union. (Courtesy of Bill Perlman)

This photo was found at Lee Perlman’s home after his death. It shows Perlman (at right) during the 1970s, when he was active in the group Portland Tenants Union. (Courtesy of Bill Perlman)

Two weeks after the death of Lee Perlman, his rundown, 110-year-old Portland bungalow is a swarm of activity. Former friends, contractors and city staffers scurry around the property dividing up the rundown home’s contents.

Every surface is covered. Newspapers are stacked four feet tall in the corners. A mound of magazines three feet high subsumes a bed. Workers shuffle through narrow spaces on a carpet of paper four inches deep.

Lee’s brother Bill Perlman, just arrived from his home in Massachusetts, stands in one corner. “It’s a shock,” he says, “but not a surprise.”

In August, Lee Perlman, at the age of 64, killed himself in his Eliot neighborhood home. The death of the well-known reporter and 40-year neighborhood activist sent shock and dismay through Portland.

Perlman — recognizable for his snowy hair and beard, button-down shirt sleeve, jeans and work boots — recorded a generation of neighborhood activism that helped transform Portland’s once-neglected urban core into one of the most livable cities in the U.S.

Read the Rest at The Oregonian/OregonLive

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: